Repeating Surface Pattern

We have had a lot of interest from out readers about Repeating Surface Pattern (RSP) which was mentioned in our earlier article about protecting your design were we mentioned Cath Kidston pattern designs.  So we thought it was a good idea to give some more examples of RSP.


Louis Vuitton the famous luxury lifestyle brand has create a repeating surface pattern that is distinctive and iconic to its brand worldwide.  This instantly recognisable pattern design creates a strong brand presence, how often have you noticed someone with a Louis Vuitton Bag or purse on the street – likely quite a lot and this is because of the striking pattern that is eye catching thus creating brand awareness.  The striking pattern has become part of the company image and  so if anyone (and we know they do) were to copy the design, it maybe mistaken for a Louis Vuitton product.  

In contrast to Louis Vuitton textile repeating surface pattern, Farrow & Ball the manufacturers of traditional wallpapers and paint (and eco friendly paint!) have created this detail wallpaper paper that has a RSP of flowers.  Farrow and Ball produce wall papers that have a greater depth of colour as well as interesting and beautiful designs.  As the company is focused on paints and wall paper it is important to create great designs that people like that is exclusively Farrow and Balls products.

Another example repeating surface pattern is Laura Ashley’s pastel coloured wallpaper featuring birds, flowers and trees.  The RSP and colours used on this wall paper are very fitting to the Laura Ashley brand.  Through the RSP the Laura Ashley image is projected creating brand awareness through the pattern design of the wallpaper.

 

Creating distinctive design patterns (RSP) can help you create awareness to your design style, RSP protection is most commonly used in textile, design, printing and clothing.

 

 

2 Responses to Repeating Surface Pattern

  1. Nicholas Duddy May 30, 2013 at 3:29 pm

    How do you make a RSP?

  2. Paul Duddy May 31, 2013 at 6:05 am

    An RSP is protected through the same process as registering a design. More info here: http://pinso.co.uk/2012/09/design-registration-how-to-apply/

    When filling in the form you simply ensure that the RSP is checked and that you have clearly highlighted the RSP design.

    Registered Designs included RSP and are the simplest form of design protection.

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